Renewable energy: saves money, energy, reduces carbon footprint

Wyatt Whelan, PosiGen install supervisor, secures a photovoltaic panel to a roof May 11, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. One hundred forty-nine houses in the Dover Family Housing community are scheduled to have the panels installed on them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Wyatt Whelan, PosiGen install supervisor, secures a photovoltaic panel to a roof May 11, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. One hundred forty-nine houses in the Dover Family Housing community are scheduled to have the panels installed on them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Wyatt Whelan, left, and Eric Roberts, both PosiGen install supervisors, move a photovoltaic (PV) panel to a roof May 11, 2018, in the Dover Family Housing community at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Depending on the size of the housing unit, installation of the PV panels generally takes three to five days. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Wyatt Whelan, left, and Eric Roberts, both PosiGen install supervisors, move a photovoltaic (PV) panel to a roof May 11, 2018, in the Dover Family Housing community at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Depending on the size of the housing unit, installation of the PV panels generally takes three to five days. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

A group of unboxed photovoltaic (PV) panels wait to be taken to a job site in the Dover Family Housing community May 11, 2018, at the Base Theater on Dover Air Force Base, Del. One hundred forty-nine houses in the DFH community are scheduled to have the panels installed on them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

A group of unboxed photovoltaic (PV) panels wait to be taken to a job site in the Dover Family Housing community May 11, 2018, at the Base Theater on Dover Air Force Base, Del. One hundred forty-nine houses in the DFH community are scheduled to have the panels installed on them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Photovoltaic (PV) panels installed on the front side of two houses in the Dover Family Housing community absorb sunlight to generate electricity May 11, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Electricity generated by PV panels is transmitted to the electrical grid, not the individual house or houses. Occupants will not see a reduction in their electricity bill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Photovoltaic (PV) panels installed on the front side of two houses in the Dover Family Housing community absorb sunlight to generate electricity May 11, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Electricity generated by PV panels is transmitted to the electrical grid, not the individual house or houses. Occupants will not see a reduction in their electricity bill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Photovoltaic (PV) panels installed on the back side of housing units in the Dover Family Housing community absorb sunlight to generate electricity May 11, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Electricity generated by PV panels is transmitted to the electrical grid, not the individual housing units. Occupants will not see a reduction in their electricity bill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Photovoltaic (PV) panels installed on the back side of housing units in the Dover Family Housing community absorb sunlight to generate electricity May 11, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Electricity generated by PV panels is transmitted to the electrical grid, not the individual housing units. Occupants will not see a reduction in their electricity bill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Electricity generated by photovoltaic (PV) panels is directed to inverter units prior to entering the electrical grid May 11, 2018, in the Dover Family Housing community at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Electricity generated by PV panels is transmitted to the electrical grid, not the individual house, thus reducing Hunt Military Communities’ cost for purchasing electricity from local sources. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Electricity generated by photovoltaic (PV) panels is directed to inverter units prior to entering the electrical grid May 11, 2018, in the Dover Family Housing community at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Electricity generated by PV panels is transmitted to the electrical grid, not the individual house, thus reducing Hunt Military Communities’ cost for purchasing electricity from local sources. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, Del. -- Keeping consistent with Department of Defense energy conservation initiatives, 149 of 982 houses at Dover Family Housing community known as Eagle Heights, are scheduled to have rooftop photovoltaic (PV) panels, commonly known as solar panels, installed over the next five months.

Upon Department of the Air Force approval for this long-term energy sustainable project, Hunt Military Communities partnered with Hunt Alternative Energy and True Green Capital Management, LLC, a private equity fund based in Westport, Connecticut, focused on distributed energy infrastructure projects.

Hunt Alternative Energy developed the project working with the Air Force Civil Engineer Center from the project’s inception to obtain the necessary entitlements and approvals from different project stakeholders. True Green Capital will own and operate the projects under a 20-year agreement with Hunt Military Communities.

PosiGen, headquartered in Jefferson, Louisiana, is a nationwide solar energy service provider performing the design and installation of the PV panels and associated equipment here in the housing area.

“I am very pleased that Hunt is venturing into renewable energy in Eagle Heights Housing. Hunt is seizing an opportunity to help long-term funding of the Eagle Heights community. There are many benefits to this effort,” said Col. Randy Boswell, 436th Mission Support Group commander. “First, the funds generated by transmitting energy back into the electric grid helps offset operating expenses allowing more dollars to flow into savings accounts for future repairs. Secondly, the project helps the Air Force and Delaware meet goals for purchasing clean energy and reducing our carbon footprint.”

Electricity generated by PV panels are directed to the electrical grid, not the individual house, thus reducing Hunt’s cost for purchasing electricity.

“Occupants of houses with PV panels installed will not see their individual electricity bill go down,” said Terris Bagwell, HMC community director. “The reduction in Hunt’s energy bill will allow recapitalization and reinvestment by Hunt for ongoing community improvement projects.”

Depending on the size of the house, installation of the PV panels generally takes three to five days.

“PosiGen is honored to have been selected to work with the Hunt Military Communities and Hunt Alternative Energy groups,” said Thomas Neyhart, CEO PosiGen Solar Support. “We are excited to bring the many benefits of solar energy to Dover Family Housing.”

Houses identified for PV panel installation primarily face between the south and west direction.

“The installation project started on May 2, 2018,” said Tom Charlip, PosiGen senior operations manager.

The DFH community center has been identified as one of the 149 to have PV panels installed.

"True Green Capital Management is pleased to expand its existing relationship with Hunt Military Communities and the U.S. Air Force and continue to provide lower cost, clean and self-generated energy to the local community," said Bo Wiegand, partner at True Green Capital Management, LLC.

Many agencies partnered together to make this project come to fruition.

“AFCEC and base leadership support has been instrumental in the project’s success, and we look forward to working together on additional projects,” said Mark Begeny of Hunt Alternative Energy.

Depending on weather conditions, PV panel installation is scheduled to be completed by the first week in August, according to Charlip.

Boswell said, “I look forward to seeing the project completed and the long-term success of our housing community.”