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Security forces swaps motors for pedals

Airman 1st Class Hunter Mowery, 436th Security Forces Squadron response force member, patrols the family housing area on his bicycle Oct. 25, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Bike patrol members wear a highly-visible white shirt with “police” stenciled on the back, blue shorts, ride a mountain bike equipped with police lights and saddle bags with “police” stenciled on them

Airman 1st Class Hunter Mowery, 436th Security Forces Squadron response force member, patrols the family housing area on his bicycle Oct. 25, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Bike patrol members wear a highly-visible white shirt with “police” stenciled on the back, blue shorts, ride a mountain bike equipped with police lights and saddle bags with “police” stenciled on them. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Airman 1st Class Hunter Mowery, 436th Security Forces Squadron response force member, watches a school bus drive through the family housing area Oct. 25, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Being visible day or night and establishing one-on-one relationships within the Team Dover community is the goal of the 436th Security Forces Squadron.

Airman 1st Class Hunter Mowery, 436th Security Forces Squadron response force member, watches a school bus drive through the family housing area Oct. 25, 2018, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Being visible day or night and establishing one-on-one relationships within the Team Dover community is the goal of the 436th Security Forces Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Dover Air Force Base, Del. -- If you’re a resident at Eagle Heights family housing chances are you’ve seen Airmen of the 436th Security Forces Squadron patrolling the streets, not only in a squad car, but on bicycles as well. Since 2014, the 436th SFS has maintained a volunteer force of Airmen who have opted to patrol base housing via bicycle rather than car during the spring, summer and early fall months.

“For younger Airmen it’s hard to get on the road,” said Airman 1st Class Hunter Mowery, 436th SFS response force member and bike patrol volunteer. “Bike patrol was the easiest way for me to get on the road and do police work. My favorite part about bike patrol is working the school zones and answering questions for the kids.”

Family housing has several recreational areas, including playgrounds and basketball courts, nestled along almost four miles of walking and biking paths that cut through the different neighborhoods. The bike patrol’s mission allows security forces quick and easy access to these areas.

“The advantage to bike patrol is we are able to do more community policing, which in turn builds better community relationships with security forces,” said 2nd Lt. Henry Hill, 436th SFS operations officer. “On top of that we are able to patrol [some] areas better with a bike [than we can] a patrol car.”

By reducing the mileage wear and tear on the unit’s patrol vehicles, the bike patrol program also helps reduce fuel and vehicle maintenance costs. A reduction in vehicle emissions means good news for the environment and the extra cardio means good news for Airmen.

There are currently 10 security forces Airmen participating in bike patrol, and the squadron plans to increase participation next spring.