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To fly, or not to fly, that is the question

Staff Sgt. Ivan Guzman, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, looks over an approaching weather system Jan. 24, 2019, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. During the spring and summer, forecasters are able to use equipment to produce a 3-D generated model, allowing them to better understand where hazardous weather is and where aircraft can fly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Staff Sgt. Ivan Guzman, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, looks over an approaching weather system Jan. 24, 2019, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. During the spring and summer, forecasters are able to use equipment to produce a 3-D generated model, allowing them to better understand where hazardous weather is and where aircraft can fly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Staff Sgt. Ivan Guzman, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, holds a weather-monitoring device Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The device not only displays wind information but also humidity, temperature and a host of other metrics. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Staff Sgt. Ivan Guzman, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, holds a weather-monitoring device Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The device not only displays wind information but also humidity, temperature and a host of other metrics. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Senior Airman Aaron Cathey, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, inspects connections of a tactical meteorological observation system Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The equipment provides redundancy for stationary equipment around the runway and is also capable of being used in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Senior Airman Aaron Cathey, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, inspects connections of a tactical meteorological observation system Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The equipment provides redundancy for stationary equipment around the runway and is also capable of being used in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Senior Airman Aaron Cathey, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, checks data on a tactical meteorological observation system Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The equipment provides redundancy for stationary equipment around the runway and is also capable of being used in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Senior Airman Aaron Cathey, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, checks data on a tactical meteorological observation system Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The equipment provides redundancy for stationary equipment around the runway and is also capable of being used in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Senior Airman Aaron Cathey, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, uses a handheld weather-monitoring device to gather meteorological information Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. Checks using the handheld device are taken from the same location to ensure consistency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Senior Airman Aaron Cathey, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, uses a handheld weather-monitoring device to gather meteorological information Jan. 24, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. Checks using the handheld device are taken from the same location to ensure consistency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Airman 1st Class Jeremy Knighton, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, illustrates upcoming weather during a morning briefing Jan. 25, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. Weather briefings ensure decision-makers understand upcoming weather conditions and how they may affect Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

Airman 1st Class Jeremy Knighton, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster, illustrates upcoming weather during a morning briefing Jan. 25, 2019, on Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. Weather briefings ensure decision-makers understand upcoming weather conditions and how they may affect Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Duhon)

DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, Del. -- Weather is all around us. The weather determines whether an outdoor expedition will prove enjoyable or whether a routine drive could prove perilous. It can either make our day or dampen it, literally.

February 5, 2019, is National Weatherperson’s Day and is dedicated to recognizing and honoring American weather professionals. Among those professionals are the members of Team Dover’s weather flight: a team of highly trained weather specialists who keep Airmen and aircraft safe.

“Weather affects every agency,” said Staff Sgt. Ivan Guzman, 436th Operations Support Squadron weather forecaster. “Whether from cancellation of missions or physical fitness tests, to how maintainers can work on an aircraft, we are important.”

The weather may postpone a Physical Fitness Test, cause maintenance delays or even shut the whole base down; however, something more crucial to mission accomplishment is the possible grounding of our fleet. Serious weather conditions, such as heavy winds, rain, ice or snow, can delay the flights of our giant metal birds.

“Weather drives everything we do,” said Maj. Mathew Froehlich, 3rd Airlift Squadron C-5M Super Galaxy pilot. “It is such a big player into how we plan any mission. We plan around weather – before, during and even after.”

Regarding the day dedicated to recognizing the hard work of the weather flight, Froehlich had plenty to say.

“They are always there for us,” said Froehlich. “These guys are there when we show up for a mission, confirming destinations and give me information that is different than what I planned on. I am glad they are there; they are a good blanket for us before we step out to go fly.”