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  • Shouldering, shedding and sharing burdens

    The word burden often carries a negative connotation. The word burden often conjures up thoughts of hardship and despair. Years ago, my greatest source of inspiration for leadership, “The Book,” changed how I viewed the concept of burdens. My favorite chapter provides three major takeaways on the concept: some burdens are meant to be shouldered; some burdens are meant to be shed; some burdens are meant to be shared.
  • Celebrating military children

    What is the origin of the Month of the Military Child? The Month of the Military Child is part of a legacy left by former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger. Since his establishment of the Month of the Military Child in 1986, there have been an increasing number of campaigns, recognizing the needs of military children. Weinberger wanted to reflect and recognize the contributions and personal sacrifices our children make to our armed forces. He saw the need to not leave children behind.
  • Leveraging Technology for More Effective Teams

    In March of 2020 a public health emergency was declared on Dover AFB due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The idea that we have been operating with constraints of various forms for over a year at this point is absolutely astonishing to me. I’m sure most can relate when I say some days it seems like this all started a couple months ago, while other days it is difficult to remember how we did some things before this all began. What is certain is the fact technology played a critical role in getting leaders and their organizations through the toughest of times.
  • The Importance of Leading Up

    When I arrived at Dover for my command tour, I was coming off a year as an instructor at Squadron Officer School, followed by a year as a student at Air Command and Staff College, where I was introduced to a concept called meta-leadership. The concept was originally developed at Harvard and is presented in many different variations. The version I was introduced to is represented by four arrows pointing up, down, left and right to represent the concepts of leading up, down, across and beyond.
  • Rethinking how we lead

    While there are many theories on leadership, it is inherently up to each individual to determine how they will lead. I used this as motivation to read multiple leadership books leading up to my Change of Command to prepare myself for what was to come. Knowing that I was leaving a staff position with senior leaders to lead first term Airman, I felt it was important to understand what their values and concerns were. What I was not prepared for is how different today’s Airmen are from my expectations. Today’s Airmen are highly educated, diverse and independent thinkers.
  • Overcoming “It”

    Have you had a life altering moment? Not like dodging a car accident that made your heart skip a few beats. I’m talking about a moment where the fundamentals of who you are become questioned. The type when you look in the mirror and the reflection you see is not yours. If you have, I want you to think back to that specific moment in time when you decided not to let “it” define you. This very sentence reminds me of a revealing quote by Simon Sinek, “Most of us live our lives by accident-we live as it happens. Fulfillment comes when we live our lives on purpose.”
  • On hope … and trust … oh, and perseverance!

    This message’s intent is to provide a perspective on what it takes to move our jets nowadays, how the events of 2020 have influenced life on the road, and pass some thanks to the fantastic community that supports us.
  • Quotes from my mobility pilot granduncle’s war diary

    From Oprah Winfrey to Mark Zuckerberg, our nation’s most successful leaders are readers. Warren Buffet spends 80 percent of his day reading. Bill Gates reads 50 books per year. Former U.S. Secretary of Defense and retired Marine general James Mattis carried around a library of 6,000 books with him, everywhere he went. For those who feel they are too busy to read, take heed to the message this legendary general, sometimes referred to as “The Warrior Monk,” had for his troops: “The problem with being too busy to read is that you learn by experience, i.e. the hard way. By reading, you learn through others’ experiences, generally a better way to do business, especially in our line of work where the consequences of incompetence are so final.”
  • Balancing operations in congested and contested environments

    Today’s complex security landscape, characterized by an increased rate of technological change and rising great power competition, means the Mobility Air Force (MAF) faces a unique set of challenges. While maintaining the underpinnings of our nation’s power projection is still our critical mission, we find ourselves balancing operations in contested environments with operations in congested environments.
  • Relationships matter

    Establishing real and lasting relationships is the key to mission success. The relationships you create here at Dover are crucial, and the bonds you build, both on- and off-base, move the rapid global mobility mission forward – every single day.
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