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Cooking with caution this Thanksgiving

A thermometer lists the temperature of a turkey fryer Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. The oil temperature in the turkey fryer should be between 325 and 350 degrees while the internal meat of the bird should be between 175 and 180 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

A thermometer lists the temperature of a turkey fryer Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. The oil temperature in the turkey fryer should be between 325 and 350 degrees while the internal meat of the bird should be between 175 and 180 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Donning protective gloves, Master Sgt. John Willard, the NCO in charge of flight safety with the 436th Airlift Wing Safety Office, removes a turkey from its packaging Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Fires caused by improper usage of turkey fryers are one of the top causes for home fires during the holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Donning protective gloves, Master Sgt. John Willard, the NCO in charge of flight safety with the 436th Airlift Wing Safety Office, removes a turkey from its packaging Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Fires caused by improper usage of turkey fryers are one of the top causes for home fires during the holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

A thermometer is inserted into a turkey after it is removed from a turkey fryer Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. The oil temperature in the turkey fryer should be between 325 and 350 degrees while the internal meat of the bird should be between 175 and 180 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

A thermometer is inserted into a turkey after it is removed from a turkey fryer Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. The oil temperature in the turkey fryer should be between 325 and 350 degrees while the internal meat of the bird should be between 175 and 180 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Master Sgt. John Willard, the NCO in charge of flight safety with the 436th Airlift Wing Safety Office, lowers a turkey into a turkey fryer Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Fires caused by improper usage of turkey fryers are one of the top causes for home fires during the holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Master Sgt. John Willard, the NCO in charge of flight safety with the 436th Airlift Wing Safety Office, lowers a turkey into a turkey fryer Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Fires caused by improper usage of turkey fryers are one of the top causes for home fires during the holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Tech. Sgt. Paul Poggenpohl, NCO in charge of ground safety of the 436th Airlift Wing Safety Office, slices a freshly-cooked turkey Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Fires caused by improper usage of turkey fryers are one of the top causes for home fires during the holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

Tech. Sgt. Paul Poggenpohl, NCO in charge of ground safety of the 436th Airlift Wing Safety Office, slices a freshly-cooked turkey Nov. 16, 2012, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Fires caused by improper usage of turkey fryers are one of the top causes for home fires during the holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik)

DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, Del. -- In preparation for Thanksgiving, the 436th Airlift Wing Safety Office hosted a turkey frying demonstration Nov. 16, 2012. During this demonstration, wing safety members showcased the proper way to handle and cook the turkey. See the images for more information.