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  • Week 3 (Sept. 13-19): Prepare for Disasters

    Know what disasters and hazards could affect our area, how to get emergency alerts and where you would go if you and your family needed to evacuate. Make sure your family has a plan and practices it often.
  • Week 2 (Sept. 6-12): Build a Kit

    After an emergency, you may need to survive on your own for several days. Being prepared means having your own food, water and other supplies to last for “3 to 5 days” (FEMA standard). A disaster supplies kit is a collection of basic items your household may need in the event of an emergency.
  • Your life is precious

    Suicide is a tragic event, and I can’t imagine all the different stories that lead up to someone taking their life. Know this: Your life makes an imprint upon others in ways beyond what you can imagine. As a pastor and a chaplain, I urge every reader of this commentary to consider that their very being is precious and that they are beloved.
  • Week 1 (Sept. 1-5): Make a Plan

    Learn which types of disasters could affect your local area, and make a plan today.
  • Disasters Don't Wait

    It’s National Preparedness Month! Great … But what does that mean?
  • The Big Picture

    EO incidents happen for a reason, and they create opportunities – opportunities for people to learn from one other. The driving force behind many of the complaints that I have had the unfortunate pleasure to process is lack of communication. Communication will allow you to resolve concerns at the lowest level. Effective communication can resolve workplace disputes, personality conflicts and perceptions. The person that seems problematic may need a new challenge that provides him/her with fresh determination. Effective communication will open the door to life-changing dialogue.
  • Quotes from my mobility pilot granduncle’s war diary

    From Oprah Winfrey to Mark Zuckerberg, our nation’s most successful leaders are readers. Warren Buffet spends 80 percent of his day reading. Bill Gates reads 50 books per year. Former U.S. Secretary of Defense and retired Marine general James Mattis carried around a library of 6,000 books with him, everywhere he went. For those who feel they are too busy to read, take heed to the message this legendary general, sometimes referred to as “The Warrior Monk,” had for his troops: “The problem with being too busy to read is that you learn by experience, i.e. the hard way. By reading, you learn through others’ experiences, generally a better way to do business, especially in our line of work where the consequences of incompetence are so final.”
  • It's hurricane season - But why do you care?

    I know, I know … Preparing for an unlikely disaster seems like a fool’s errand. I thought the same thing – until October 2018. I was stationed at Tyndall AFB, and I was 10 days into my deployment when a ravenous Hurricane Michael (CAT-5) suddenly devoured my base and its neighboring cities, my friend’s and coworkers’ homes and all of my belongings in storage. As an Emergency Manager, I’m ashamed to say, I was not as prepared as I could have been, and I regret not taking one of nature’s most destructive forces more seriously. I urge you to not make the same mistake.
  • On integrity

    The Air Force places integrity first, because it is, without question, the most important of our core values. In its purest form, personal integrity is doing the right thing, because it is the right thing to do. Integrity serves as our moral compass, the basis for the trust imperative to military service. Without this foundational principle, nothing else we do really matters. Structural integrity is the ability of an item to hold together under a load, including its own weight, without breaking or deforming. A suspension bridge, such as the Delaware Memorial Bridge, includes anchorages, piers, towers and suspenders. Each component of the bridge is critical to its success. It takes all of the parts, acting as a whole, for the bridge to stand. Not only must they work together to maintain its form, but they must also be strong enough to stand up to the weight of their mission.
  • Independence and diversity

    Socrates said, “To find yourself, think for yourself.” To find oneself is to find one’s independence. Independence is our ability to make decisions and live life free from the control or influence of other people. This definition would suggest that independence can be an isolating concept, but in reality, independence can be a valuable and uniting force. For centuries, men and women from around the globe have joined to fight for their right to be valued, heard, respected and equal; to be recognized for their own individuality; and to be independent. Throughout our history and even in our Air Force today, many Airmen feel they have lost their individuality; that they are not seen, heard, valued or respected for who they are; and that they have lost their independence. So how do we fix this?
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